‘Shipshape 10’ News for Week Ending December 25, 2016

‘Shipshape 10 List’, a list of news and articles published in the current week that a senior executive in shipping, shipping finance, commodities, energy, supply chain and infrastructure should had noticed; news and articles that are shaping the agenda and the course of the maritime industry.

Sometimes seemingly tangential, sometimes humorous, occasionally sarcastic, but always insightful and topical.

And, this week’s ‘Shipshape 10’:                                                                                                         
Heading to the Holiday Season, market activity has been slowing down as would expect. Still several news stories to report reflecting the year’s tumultuous course for the shipping industry. This week’s top news:

Two Maersk-owned offshore assets (‘Maersk Shipper’ and ‘Maersk Searcher’) while under tow by yet another Maersk-owned anchor-handling tug support vessel, AHTS ‘Maersk Battler’, sank off the French coast while en route to Turkey to be demolished. The newsworthiness of the story is not in the shipwreck itself – towing vessels in the open sea is a very complicated exercise and is reflected to the insurance premiums to underwrite the tow, ask us – but in the fact that terrible accidents happen even under mighty Maersk’s watch, even when only Maersk vessels and personnel are involved:

1. Maersk Supply Services vessel pair sink en route to scrapyard (from Splash 24/7)

On the shipping finance front, rather surprising news that RBS has reportedly agreed to sell $600 mil in shipping loans to a syndicate of buyers; the shipping finance team of Reuters in London and Frankfurt once again ‘scooped’ the story; and once again, the shipping trade press was left behind and ‘copying and pasting’ the story:

2. RBS near to selling $600 million of shipping loans: sources (from Reuters)

The fact that shipping banks are leaving the industry, there seem to be an opportunity for alternative financing; two encouraging developments in this front this week:

3. Northern Shipping smashes third fund target (from Splash 24/7)

And after almost three years of efforts:

4. Maritime & Merchant Bank launches (from Splash 24/7)

Still on the same front of credit provided by alternative sources of capital, Bloomberg run a great story this week:

5. The $12 Trillion Credit Risk Juggle (from Bloomberg)

Taking a look on purely shipping companies and events, the Rickmers Trust moved another step closer to liquidation:

6. Rickmers Maritime bondholders vote against restructuring, liquidation looms (from Seatrade Maritime News)

While another 30-year ship-manager / shipowner closed the doors at the insistence of their main credit, the ING bank:

7. ‘That’s it, Flinter is no longer’: Dutch line dissolves (from Splash 24/7)

And Hanjin selling their stake in the Long Beach Terminal (TTI), following their recent bankruptcy:

8. Hanjin to Sell Stake in U.S. Terminal to Mediterranean Shipping (from the Wall Street Journal)

On more hopeful news, the Dow Jones Industrial Index (DJII) almost reached the major milestone of 20,000 points following the rocket-trajectory after the Trump election; some doubts still hover about the nature of the rally (‘faith-based rally), but again, if we learned anything from shipping in 2016 is that rallies, any type of rallies, are better than declines:

9. A Faith-Based Rally? Warning Lights Are Flashing – Before Anyone Gets Too Euphoric About Dow 20,000 (from Barron’s)

And, taking a quick look in 2017, commodities seem to provide a promising place to invest; which, by association, is positive news for shipping:

10. 2017: Time to Buy Commodities (from Barron’s)                                                                     
Merry Christmas, and a most joyous Happy Holiday Season!

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A bright light! Image credit: Karatzas Images


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website.Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

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‘Shipshape 10’ News for Week Ending November 27, 2016

‘Shipshape 10 List’, a list of news and articles published in the current week that a senior executive in shipping, shipping finance, commodities, energy, supply chain and infrastructure should had noticed; news and articles that are shaping the agenda and the course of the maritime industry.                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Sometimes seemingly tangential, sometimes humorous, occasionally sarcastic, but always insightful and topical.
                                                                                                                                             And, this week’s ‘Shipshape 10’:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 The dry bulk market has been having an exceptional time, all things considered, and the Baltic Dry Index (BDI) has almost tripled since February this year when the market established an absolute bottom. Lots of researching whether this is due to a structural recovery or plain seasonality.

1. Dry-Bulk Shipping Owners Get Reprieve as Rates Rebound (from the Wall Street Journal)  

In the containership market, another bleak sign where a seven-year old panamax containership vessel was sold for scrap; less than a decade ago, such vessels were selling for $80 million. A sign of how bad the overall containership market is, and the high asset risk shipowners (and investors) have to undertake:

2. Seven-year-old Rickmers boxship sent for scrap (from Splash 24/7)    

While post-elections in the US has been lots of speculation about the direction of the new administration in terms of trade and infrastructure projects, a couple of articles on the subject:

3. TPP: What is it and why does it matter? (from BBC)

and,

4. China Touts Its Own Trade Pact as U.S.-Backed One Withers (from the Wall Street Journal)

In our last week’s report, we included an article about the Taiwanese government setting up emergency funding for their shipping sector; and, the week before that, another article about the S. Korean government supporting their shipping sector. Now, the Singaporean government falls in line, too, by supporting their offshore sector. Hopefully the Greek shipowners will manage to do without government support, if need be. (“One cannot take from someone who does not own” from the Dialogues of the Dead, Lucian of Samosata, 2nd century BC; cynic philosopher Menippos would not pay a coin (obol) to Charon, the ferryman of Hades of the souls of newly deceased, arguing as above; a very valid argument in today’s Greece, in any case.)

5. Singapore government intervenes to save struggling offshore sector (from Splash 24/7)

However, it’s worth noting that Korea Line Company (KLC), a company that had their own spectacular bankruptcy a few years ago in Korea, now has outbid the favorite Hyundai Merchant Marine (HMM) acquiring Hanjin Shipping’s container business; strangely, Korea Line never before had an exposure to or experience with the containership business. Having a previously bankrupt company rehabilitated and growing would seem to be the forces of capitalism at their best:

6. Why is Korea Line buying Hanjin Shipping’s Asia – US container business? (from Seatrade)

However, HMM who was poised to join the 2M Alliance (A.P. Moeller Maersk and MSC), now has been rejected by 2M; for sure, the containership liner industry is in the middle of major re-alignments in a market that keeps looking gloomy:

7. 2M Alliance rejects HMM (from the Korea Times)                                                        

Another week, and another shipping bank has to break some more bad news. NordLB in the news with additional provisions for their shipping loan portfolio:

8. NordLB warns on €1bn loss for year as shipping loans bite (from the Financial Times)

However, the capital markets show signs of thawing for shipping ideas, at least selectively. The Saverys family managed to raise $100 million for their Special Purpose Acquisition Vehicle (SPAC) for acquiring distressed shipping assets (ticker: HUNTU):

9. Hunters with a big warchest for dry bulk shipping (from Seatrade)

Some thoughts about shipping, mostly positive, ‘thankful’ thinking, in the spirit of the season:

10. A Thanksgiving for shipping (from Splash 24/7)

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A majestic sunset. Image credit: Karatzas Images


© 2013 – present Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website.Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

‘Shipshape 10’ News for Week Ending November 13, 2016

The major event of the week of course has been the election of Donald J Trump as the 45th President of the United States. The event has been surprising as most predictors had this event as the less favorable outcome (“The American Brexit”); also, given that most of the election campaign took place on personal and not on substantive debating terms, there is has been lots of head-scratching since Wednesday morning on what would happen next; the major consensus is that the new Administration is in general in favor of anti-globalization, re-shoring, and higher barriers for trade (tariffs, ‘currency manipulator’ and anti-dumping have been heard with come frequency), the consensus has been that trade and shipping stand to suffer in the next four years:

1. Shipping Industry Feels Shock Waves From Donald Trump Election (The Wall Street Journal, Logistics Report)

2. On trade and expectations,                                                                                     America and the world, The Piecemaker (The Economist)

3. While in the same week, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) published some sobering thoughts on the maritime industry:                         Review of Maritime Transport 2016 (UNCTAD)

4. In the short term however, the dry bulk market has had a great week, especially for the capesize market on behalf of coal trades to China:
Dry Bulk FFA: Market Explodes as Atlantic Cargoes Offer Ample Support (FIS)

5. An interesting reading on China and ‘One Belt, One Road’ from the respected Week in China:
All at Sea (Week in China)

6. Another week, and another shipping bank wish ‘Bon voyage’ to the shipping industry:   Bank of Ireland joins other banks in shipping loan wind down (Reuters)

7. while, another shipping bank is looking to raise more capital; one gets the picture, with the shipping banks:                                                                                                             Shipping Bank DVB Prepares Capital Increase (Reuters, via the Maritime Executive)

8. The Singapore Exchange (SGX) has formally closed on the acquisition of the legendary Baltic Exchange, producer of the well-known Baltic Exchange Dry Bulk Index (BDI); the transaction is indicative of a changing world, where shipping cannot be considered a stand-alone industry any more, while at the same time it seems that the center of gravity has been shifting eastwards:                                                                                       Baltic Exchange Takeover Complete (The Maritime Executive)

9. For some interesting reading on how shipping has been evolving, an article from BBC and Remote Container Management (RCM) technology:
How do you keep bananas fresh as they cross the oceans?

10. And, for those who wish to take a minute and smell the roses, actually feel nostalgic about the past and the times past, an interesting piece on lighthouses in Ireland:
Keeping the Fire of Irish Lighthouses Alive (The New York Times)


panama-old-city-bmk_1032© 2013-2015 Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website.Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

‘Shipshape 10’ News for Week Ending October 30, 2016

After some long absence, we return to our blog and hereby we are establishing Shipping’s ‘Shipshape 10 List’, a list of links to news and articles that were published in the current week that encompass all the information a top executive in shipping, shipping finance, commodities, energy, supply chain and infrastructure should had read in the week.

Sometimes tangential, sometimes humorous, sometimes sarcastic, but always insightful and topical.

Hope you enjoy it!                                                                                                                      
1. Reuters Exclusive: Deutsche Bank among bidders for HSH Nordbank’s debt portfolio (Reuters)                                                                                                      Another week, another shipping bank transaction

2. Wall Street Journal: Maritime Nations Agree to Cut Pollution From Ships in 2020 (Wall Street Journal Logistics Report)                                                                  Forcing lower emissions with the shipping industry, this IMO regulation can act as a catalyst for developments that should had happened sometime ago

3. IMO: No Final Climate Plan Until 2023 (The Maritime Executive)
Fast, but not so fast. SOx bad, COx can take longer… Go figure!

4. IMF Estimates Restructuring Cost at W31 trillion (US$ 27 billion) for S. Korea’s shipping and shipbuilding industries (Korea Times)                                                     S. Korea’s aggressive strategy  in  shipping and shipbuilding industries will need major resources to weather a bad cycle after developments with Hanjin Shipping, Hyundai Merchant Marine, Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering, …

5. Blystad readies $100 million dry bulk bing with OTC filing at Oslo Bors (Splash 24/7)
Trying to crack open the capital markets in this weak market; hoping that more will emerge, successfully.

6. The Tale of Two Canals – Game Theory in Action (Splash 24/7)                               The Suez Canal announced a new payment structure for canal dues, trying to position more competitively against the new Panama Canal locks and capacity.

7. Maersk, MSC to Charter Nine Former Hanjin Ships (The Wall Street Journal Logistics Report)
Looking for solutions and cashflows in the wake of Hanjin’s receivership filing with strategically placed charterers; but at what price?

8. Hyundai Merchant Marine Bids for Hanjin (The Maritime Executive)
Hanjin assets and routes and business up for sale; co-patriot Hyundai Merchant Marine should logically be the strongest contestant in this weak market

9. Wind and solar advance in the power war against coal (The Economist)

10. Titanic locker key sold for £85,000 at auction (BBC News)
More than a century later, the ’unsinkable ship’ keeps captivating

Bonus Feature: Two Offen-linked MR Tankers on the Sales Block (Lloyd’s List) Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co and Toepfer Transport GmbH have been given joint-exclusive mandate by the Insolvency Administrator in Germany for the sale of MT ‘CPO Japan’ and MT ‘CPO Korea’

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All the SOx and Nox and COx of the world… Not a day too soon for the IMO to act. Image credit: Karatzas Images


© 2013-2015 Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website.Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.

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Tanker Sale & Purchase (S&P) Update

In an effort to be more efficient and focused, from now we will report on this blog only pertinent transactions per market segment and asset class for s&p (sale & purchase market) that have occurred in the last couple of weeks. Transactions and transaction details in shipping are never as transparent and clear-cut as many an analyst or an appraiser may wish to think; having the benefit of time-lapse and fact-checking, we believe that reporting more accurately sales vs reporting them prompter is of greater service to our readership. Also, our reporting will be more structured by market segment and asset class going forward. Transactions will be purely reported herewith; commentary on market conditions and trends, discussion on transactions and developments and their significance will be posted at our sistership blog, Shipping Finance by Karatzas Marine.

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As always, shipbrokerage and shipping finance advisory is provide by our sponsor company, Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.


Despite the softening of tanker freight rates in the last two weeks, one has to be humbly impressed by the performance of the tanker sector over the last twelve months, and accept that volatility in the shipping industry is hard to accurately model: VLCC spot rates (the group most volatile but with the easiest-models-to-build of the tanker market) have moved from $33,000 pd this time last year to above the $60,000 pd mark on several occasions in January, March and May this year, flirted teasingly with the $90,000 pd mark three weeks ago, and now have come full circle to appr. $34,000 pd. It has been a great market of sorts, definitely in comparative terms to dry bulk and containership markets, but still, some people have been worrying whether the structural recovery of the sector is still intact: the demolition pace has slowed down, newbuilding activity has increased, but still the time lapse of the deliveries (about a two-year-delay) does not seem to provide much comfort or confidence: tanker stock prices have not outperformed the broad market, to put it liberally, and most of the tanker stocks trade barely at or below NAV at the very best (the implied valuation of their tankers-on-the-water), while tanker IPO hopefuls waiting in the wings, and waiting… and tanker vessel prices really have not justified the buy-low-sell-high asset play strategy of many a shipowner.

The sale and purchase market has quieted down in the last two weeks, partially due to peak vacation season and also due to the chilling effect of a deflating tanker freight market. Besides the rather un-inspiring prices achieved, several of the sales have been controlled by financial investors, including private equity funds. The involvement of private equity funds with shipping has drawn much attention and we have written on the topic in the past; however, seeing York Capital, Wayzata Investments and Apollo, among others, selling vessels – and not shares at IPOs as per original game plan, and sales of vessels in a ‘hot’ market and at prices that do not seem to come remotely close to highly advertised double-digit expected returns of the private equity…but again, barely a week passes with funds folding due to poor performance because of commodities, currencies, emerging markets…at least, shipping has not sunk a fund yet, at least formally.

In the VLCC market, Tufton Oceanic has disposed of MT ‘Sasa’ (300,000 dwt, Hitachi Zosen, 2001) at $40.5 mil to Russian buyers, while Windsor Petroleum has sold to US-based Ridgebury Tankers four sistership vessels at a value-oriented price of $150 mil for the package: MT ‘British Purpose’, MT ‘Progress’, MT ‘Pride’ and MT ‘Pioneer’ (all ca. 305,000 dwt, Samsung Heavy Industries, 2000/2000/2000/1999).

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House-flag in the news… Karatzas Photographie Maritime

The Suezmax market has been more active in the last month, reflecting a more fragmented market but also a stronger freight market. The transaction that stood out was the sale of the Veritable fleet by Principal Maritime, which had been sponsored and funded by Apollo; one set of six sisterships built at Samsung Heavy Industries MT ‘Princimar Courage’, MT ‘Princimar Pride’, MT ‘Princimar Integrity’, MT ‘Princimar Grace’, MT ‘Princimar Hope’ and MT ‘Princimar Promise’ (158,000 dwt, Samsung H.I., 2013 / 2012 / 2012 / 2011 / 2011 / 2011, respectively), one set of two-chinese sisterships built in 2010, MT ‘Princimar Joy’ and MT ‘Princimar Strength’ (156,000, Rongsheng, 2010), one set of Japanese built sisterships MT ‘Princimar Confidence’ and MT ‘Princimar Loyalty’ (150,000 dwt, Universal, 2006) and two one-off Korean vessels, MT ‘Princimar Truth’ (160,000 dwt, Hyundai Samho, 2007) and MT ‘Princimar Faith’ (160,000, Daewoo (DSME), 2005) at $662 mil, with payment mostly in cash but also $50 mil in stock. There are several angles to see this transaction since it is estimated that the sellers realized more than $100 mil loss from the sale (estimated cost basis of ca. $770 mil), and also that the sale price was NOT the highest in this auction-like sale transaction. The company has attempted for an IPO late last year but there was not sufficient demand / pricing to proceed then, but it’s to be debated whether demand would had been enough for an IPO now in an allegedly much stronger market, at least as much as freight is concerned. Russian tanker company Sovcomflot has sold their 2003-built Suezmax tanker MT ‘SCF Valdai’ (159,000 dwt, Hyundai Heavy, 2003) to Greek buyers at $35.5 mil. Vintage Suezmax tanker MT ‘Front Glory’ (149,500 dwt, Mitsui Shipbuilding, 1995) was sold by the Fredrisken Group to Far East buyers at $16 mil, almost twice her present scrap value (21,733 ldt). Similarly aged Suezmax tankers (with shuttle-tanker conversion) MT ‘Mattea’ (127,000 dwt, Samsung Heavy, 1997) was sold at $11 mil to undisclosed buyers, rumored Greeks, and MT ‘Kometik’ (126,500 dwt, Samsung Heavy, 1997) was sold at $8 mil to Andromeda Shipping in Monaco. Sisterships MT ‘Cape Bata’ and MT ‘Cape Bowen’ (160,000 dwt, Samsung Heavy, 2003) were sold by KG-funds in Germany to Tufton Oceanic in the UK at appr. $33 mil, each.

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A calm tanker market… Karatzas Photographie Maritime.

The aframax tanker market has been rather subdued with the exception of a financial transaction for eight coated LR2 tankers by Navig8 to Chinese buyers at $300 mil; given that there is bareboat back for ten years to sellers / Navig8 little can be said for the below-market ‘sale price’ which can be attributed to the Chinese pedigree of the vessels or Navig8’s persisting rumors abut being able to fund their capex gap for their newbuilding program; vessels were: N/B CSSC Offshore Marine Guangzhou H-057 to H-061 and Hulls H-067 and H-068 (112,000 dwt, CSSC Offshore Marine Guangzhou, 2016/2017); vessels names are MT ‘Navig Gallantry’, MT ‘Navig8 Gauntlet’, MT ’Navig8 Goal’, MT ‘Navig8 Grace’, MT ‘Navig8 Gratitude’, MT ‘Navig8 Guard’, MT ‘Navig8 Guide’ and MT ‘Navig8 Gladiator’. Buyers / lessors are affiliated with the shipbuilding group.

In the MR2 tanker market, a couple of interesting transaction with sellers based in the landlocked Upper Midwest in the USA: Wayzata Investment Partners have sold two product tankers MT ‘Halstead Bay’ (51,000 dwt, SLS Shipbuilding, 2007) at $23 million and MT ‘Maxwell Bay’ (51,000, Guangzhou SY Intl, 2013) at $30 mil, to Torm in Denmark. CarVal Investors have sold sisterships MT ‘Harbour Star’ and MT ‘Super Star’ (51,000 dwt, STX SB (Jinhae), 2008) to Target Marine in Greece at $24.5 mil, each. Tankerska Next Generation has sold two 2015 resales at SPP at $38.5 mil, each to Cardiff Marine in Greece (SPP Hull 079/080, SPP, 2015). York Capital in the US has sold their interest in Hyundai Mipo Hull 2473 (51,000 dwt, HMD, 2015) at $37.5 mil to Scorpio Tankers. Finally, Eletson Corporation of Greece has sold vintage tankers MT ‘Kandilousa’ and MT ‘Serifos’ (46,700 dwt, HHI, 1995) at $8.5 mil.

Overall, the market has not been as busy as it seems with most of the transactions being of ‘corporate’ matters instead of the traditional s&p (sale & purchase). Whether there is no strong conviction from operating buyers to step up on buying or lack of capital constrain their buying appetite, financial players seem to be getting ever more obvious; not as much as with buying, but selling is welcome news as well.


 

© 2013-2015 Basil M Karatzas & Karatzas Marine Advisors & Co.  All Rights Reserved.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER:  Access to this blog signifies the reader’s irrevocable acceptance of this disclaimer. No part of this blog can be reproduced by any means and under any circumstances, whatsoever, in whole or in part, without proper attribution or the consent of the copyright and trademark holders of this website.Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information herewithin has been received from sources believed to be reliable and such information is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing, no warranties or assurances whatsoever are made in reference to accuracy or completeness of said information, and no liability whatsoever will be accepted for taking or failing to take any action upon any information contained in any part of this website.  Thank you for the consideration.